Using Evidence and Capacity to Inform Tobacco Control Policy in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

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Leading researchers, funders, scientists, policymakers and other critical stakeholders in tobacco control met in June 2013 for Using Evidence and Capacity to Inform LMIC Tobacco Control Policy, a two-day workshop to identify emerging research priorities in LMICs.

Reducing the burden of tobacco consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is an issue of international importance. Building on a 10-year review of the Fogarty Tobacco program, the Center for Global Health Studies (CGHS) at Fogarty convened leaders in tobacco use research and policy; global tobacco control funders (including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Bloomberg Initiative); Fogarty International Tobacco and Health Research and Capacity Building program grantees; and additional key stakeholders to discuss research priorities, opportunities and synergies.

​Participants discussed best practices for translating scientific evidence into policy, and explored why and how research capacity is critical to effective tobacco control policy and programs. Throughout the two days, participants identified new partnership possibilities that would better facilitate evidence-based tobacco control activities and build capacity.

Results

Background

Fogarty's tobacco program has funded more than 30 international research and research capacity building projects to conduct observational, interventional and policy research of local relevance, and build LMIC capacity in epidemiological and behavioral research, prevention, cessation treatment, communications, health services and policy research.

Steering Committee

  • Angela Pratt, World Health Organization-Geneva (co-chair)
  • Derek Yach, Vitality Group (co-chair)
  • Johanna Birckmayer, Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids
  • Thomas J. Glynn, American Cancer Society
  • K. Srinath Reddy, Public Health Foundation of India

Partners

  • National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR)
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Updated March 2016​​

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