NIH welcomes new Japanese scholars

January - February, 2009  |  Volume 8, Issue 1

A group of reception attendees look on as Dr. Michael Johnson speaks.
Fogarty Deputy Director Dr. Michael Johnson welcomes
scholars, dignitaries and freinds of the Japan Society
for the Promotion of Science, which operates an
exchange program with NIH.

Fogarty recently welcomed 15 new scientists selected by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science as they begin two years of intramural research.

“NIH has benefited from the excellent Japanese scientists and the great relationship we have established with JSPS,” said Fogarty Deputy Director Dr. Michael Johnson. "We believe this leads to mutually beneficial, long-term collaborations for both American and Japanese scientists."

The program is in its seventh year and this cohort brings to 124 the number of Ph.Ds selected by the JSPS, an independent administrative institution that plays a pivotal role in Japan's scientific and academic programs.

Dr. Keiko Ozata, of NICHD and chair of the NIH selection panel, said the training NIH provides has been “an invaluable contribution to biomedical research in Japan” by supplying “a stream of excellent scientific workforce” returning to their home country.

“The JSPS fellowship has provided excellent scientists and fostered a great relationship between Japan and the NIH,” Johnson said. “NIH intramural laboratories have trained numerous Japanese scientists, many of whom have returned to Japan and have become leaders in Japan’s growing biomedical fields.”

Dr. Keiko Ozato
Dr. Keiko Ozato of
NICHD spoke of the
mutual benefit to
Japan and the
United States of
the program.

Also speaking at the reception, following an orientation for the scholars, were Dr. Ken Bridbord, director of Fogarty’s international training and research division; Haruo Minatoya, director of the administration department of JSPS in Tokyo; and Kotaro Kodera, deputy director of the JSPS Washington office

Fogarty reviews applicants for both Japanese and U.S. science exchanges and manages the program, including the day-to-day issues faced by the JSPS fellows.

The program benefits NIH not only for the science produced by the fellows but also because the funding from Japan frees more than $600,000 a year for other research projects.

JSPS Fellows and their hosts

  • Dr. Hiroko Fujii, NICHD
  • Dr. Ken Fujii, NCI
  • Dr. Takato Hiranita, NIDA
  • Dr. Seiichiro Motegi, NCI
  • Dr. Shingo Mutoh, NIEHS
  • Dr. Kazuya Ogawa, NINDS
  • Dr. Takayuki Okana, NIDCD
  • Dr. Shuhei Sakakibara, NCI
  • Dr. Kaori Shinoda, NIAID
  • Dr. Shinji Tsutsumi, NCI
  • Dr. Toru Uchiyama, NHGRI
  • Dr. Yamanishi Tadashi, NINDS
  • Dr. Ryusuke Yoshimi, NICHD
  • Dr. Yasuo Yoshitomi, NIDCR
  • Dr. Motoso Yoshizawa, NIMH

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